Learning from Silicon Valley - some free places left
Posted: 24 January 2011 10:01 AM   [ Ignore ]
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“Learning from Silicon Valley; Innovation, entrepreneurship and Cluster Development” starts January 31st!
In this master elective you will explore the Silicon Valley modes of science and technology commercialization and its approaches to transfer knowledge from research labs to new ventures and established companies.
We will also analyze the particular role and strategies of these dynamic local firms in establishing global leadership and the reasons why Silicon Valley has become a successful cluster.

Finally we will look into its policy implications: is it possible to emulate the success of the San Jose/San Francisco/Oakland area elsewhere and what are the preconditions for ‘growing another Silicon Valley’?

After an intensive introduction to the key actors and factors making up Silicon Valley as the world’s hotbed for innovative entrepreneurship and cluster development, the course will conclude with a study trip to Silicon Valley and the Bay area. This trip will be used as a central case to the research assignment. The student costs for the trip will be € 750,- which can be reduced by performing consultancy assignments for companies.


Please find the course information including the link to the application form and the course schedule attached. The application deadline is January 27th and the obligatory kick off meeting for Leiden students is January 28th at 11.00 hrs. The meeting will be held at SBB, Snellius Building room 104 (Niels Bohrweg 1, Leiden).


Hope to see you on the 28th!


Marjolein Overmeer


Drs. Marjolein Overmeer
Awareness Manager HOPE

Learning from Silicon Valley
Course manual

Title   Learning from Silicon Valley
Course code   MoT9556
Department   - Entrepreneurship – Rotterdam School of Management, Erasmus University
- Technology Strategy and Entrepreneurship – Delft University of Technology
Teachers   Dr. Wim Hulsink
Dr. Victor Scholten
Dr. Harmen Jousma
Dr. Dap Hartmann
Dr. Luca Berchicci
Coordination   Dr. Victor Scholten (TU Delft): .(JavaScript must be enabled to view this email address)
Dr. Wim Hulsink (RSM EUR): .(JavaScript must be enabled to view this email address)

Language   English
ECTS   10
Educational form   Interactive lectures, guest lectures, mini-assignments, presentations, discussions, group assignment
Examination   Individual presentations and final paper


“Silicon Valley is the only place on Earth not trying to figure out how to become Silicon Valley Bob Metcalfe (inventor of Ethernet and Founder of 3Com)’

Course abstract
What has made Silicon Valley so productive of new technologies and new firms? How did its pioneering achievements begin - in computer networking, semiconductors, personal computing, biotechnology, and the Internet - and what forces have propelled its unprecedented growth? People in Europe and Asia seem to be fascinated by ithe success of high-technology districts like Silicon Vally, its fast-growing ‘flagship firms’ such as Google, HP, Intel. Genentech, its top class universities (Stanford and UC Berkeley (known for its academic leadership in IT, engineering, life sciences and new materials), and the prevailing entrepreneurial spirit. The academic literature, more interested in the causes of the outstanding performance of those ‘high tech’ regions, refers to the synergy between local universities and research laboratories and established high-technology companies and a large number of new technology-based firms in so-called ‘innovative milieux (Castells & Hall).’ This process of spontaneous cross-fertilization may ultimately lead towards constant innovation and an ongoing technology transfer between the major public and private stakeholders in the region, and effectively produce an almost endless number of start-up and spin-offs firms and a dense network of collaborations between large and small companies. There have been various attempts to emulate the goals, structures and cultures of Silicon Valley elsewhere around the world (e.g. Silicon Forrest, Silicon Fen, Silicon Polder, etc.).
Silicon Valley-based entrepreneurship is known for its ground-breaking entrepreneurs and investors developing new industries, the galvanizing role played by dynamic firms (either small and large) churning out breakthrough products and services, and the effective transfer of ideas and people between universities, large companies and start-up firms. In less than forty years a vibrant regional cluster in between San Francisco and San Jose (North California) has been created in which start-up entrepreneurs, investors, larger firms, universities and other supportive institutions work effectively together. This course examines the history, development, and entrepreneurial dynamics of Silicon Valley as the world’s leading hotspot for innovation.

Course objectives

•  You will develop a thorough understanding of the dynamics and constituents of national and regional innovation clusters.
•  You will develop skills to analyze national and regional innovation clusters and understand how entrepreneurial ventures can benefit from these clusters.

In this master elective you will explore the Silicon Valley modes of science and technology commercialization and its approaches to transfer knowledge from research labs to new ventures and established companies. We will also analyze the particular role and strategies of these dynamic local firms in establishing global leadership and the reasons why Silicon Valley has become a successful cluster. Finally we will look into its policy implications: is it possible to emulate the success of the San Jose/San Francisco/Oakland area elsewhere and what are the preconditions for ‘growing another Silicon Valley’? After an intensive introduction to the key actors and factors making up Silicon Valley as the world’s hotbed for innovative entrepreneurship and cluster development, the course will conclude with a study trip to Silicon Valley and the Bay area.

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