Public Graduation Presentations Friday, June 29
Posted: 22 June 2018 01:15 PM
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You’re all invited to the Public Graduation Presentations of Marieke Paardekoper, Jonna de Kruijff, Robbert Ritmeester, Danmeng Lei, Wouter Moraal, Miguel George Castello Mira, Maral Gurbanzade, Kaan Koyuncu, Caspar Silvester, Anna Chocholi, Matei Szabo, Thiago Elid Della Monica, Maarten van Hees, Maik Lanen, Lucia Martin Holguin, Pinhsien Lee, Yanni Xiong, Sieta van Horck.

Friday, June 29, 2018
Parallel sessions in Gravensteen Building room 1.11 and room 0.11, Pieterskerkhof 6,  2311 SR, Leiden.


Schedule room 0.11

09.00 - 09.35 Marieke Paardekoper
09.45 - 10.20 Jonna de Kruijff
10.30 - 11.05 Robbert Ritmeester
11.15 - 11.50 Danmeng Lei

11.50 - 12.30 BREAK

12.30 - 13.05 Wouter Moraal
13.15 - 13.50 Miguel George Castello Mira
14.00 - 14.35 Maral Gurbanzade
14.45 - 15.20 Kaan Koyuncu
15.30 - 16.05 Caspar Silvester


Schedule room 1.11
09.00 - 09.35 Anna Chocholi
09.45 - 10.20 Matei Szabo
10.30 - 11.05 Thiago Elid Della Monica
11.15 - 11.50 Maarten van Hees

11.50 - 12.30 BREAK

12.30 - 13.05 Maik Lanen
13.15 - 13.50 Lucia Martin Holguin
14.00 - 14.35 Pinhsien Lee
14.45 - 15.20 Yanni Xiong
15.30 - 16.05 Sieta van Horck


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room 0.11


09.00 – 09.35 Marieke Paardekoper
Title:The Influence on Attitude towards Piracy: a Sentiment Analysis of Dutch Media Outlets
Abstract: Intellectual property piracy is illegal and costs the relevant industries significant amounts of money, yet many people download without remorse. This attitude towards piracy has been one of the reasons why it has been difficult to battle. Through the use of the Social Cognitive Theory it can be found that two aspects influence the attitude of pirates: Outcome expectancies and social learning. Outcome expectancies influence people towards piracy, since there are many rewards and little risks or sanctions. Social learning’s effect is significant, but it is harder to determine if it is positive or negative, since it concerns the influence of peers, and in particular that of media. By performing a sentiment analysis on Dutch news articles, the attitude of media is tested to find out if social learning is a negative or positive influence. It is concluded that media do not deter people from downloading and are mostly neutral in their portrayal of piracy. This means that a possibility or changing attitude towards piracy might be found through the use of media.
Thesis advisors: Max van Duijn and Jaap van den Herik


09.45 - 10.20 Jonna de Kruijff
Title:Interpretation and use of emoji by children with ASD
Abstract: Autism Spectrum Disorders (ASD) are a group of developmental disabilities where sufferers have trouble with social skills. These people find expressing their own emotions difficult, as well as interpreting the emotions displayed by others. Subtleties like tone of voice and sarcasm may be lost on people with ASD. People with ASD also have trouble interpreting facial expressions from illustrations.
People with ASD tend to be more comfortable with online communications. Digital devices such as tablets have also been shown to help people with ASD in social interactions.
The difficulty with interpretation of emotions from facial expressions that people with ASD have has some implications for online communications, where emoji are often used to help convey emotion with text.
This project will investigate whether children with high-functioning ASD have trouble interpreting emoji, in the same way they have trouble interpreting emotions from regular facial expressions.
Thesis advisors: Max van Duijn and Carolien Rieffe


10.30 - 11.05 Robbert Ritmeester
Title:The wrong face: the contextual framing of facial expressions within pervasive narratives
Abstract: The face may very well be the most salient carrier of emotional information. When we want to know what someone is thinking or feeling the first place to look is to their face. However, facial expressions are often ambiguous: for instance, a sad person might be smiling and an angry face might be hiding fear. In such cases additional signals from the body and the voice are required next to contextual clues coming from the environment and the setting of the situation. Over the past decades the science of face-reading has been evolving towards a broad contextual view of the driving cognitive processes. The present study aims to explore this further by using the pervasive ability of puppet theatre to study the salient meaning of facial expressions. The results indicate facial expressions to be of little or no consequences for the perception of emotions by the viewer. Even further, contextual framing can cause categorical shifts when viewers attribute feelings of sadness or disgust to a character with a happy face as if it were a blanc canvas. Nevertheless, participants score significantly better than chance when remembering the characters faces, indicating these expressions have not gone unnoticed.
Thesis advisors: Max van Duijn
and Peter Meineck

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Posted: 22 June 2018 01:24 PM   [ # 1 ]
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room 0.11


11.15 - 11.50 Danmeng Lei
Title:Stigmatization in Internet language: the effect of adding insulting quasi-affixes after group names to invent new words
Abstract: A form of inventing new Internet words in China may involve stigmatization. People add cancer, bitch and other insulting words as quasi-affixes after a group name and use it to describe people who don’t necessarily belong to the group, but share stereotypical and negative characteristics with the group. This study explored if the word-building way stigmatize the original group and if it does, how worse it is. Participants in this research were divided into two groups. Group 1 (N=35) read introductions of a fictitious group named “Secret man” and an invented word “Secret man cancer”. As the control group, Group 2 (N=36) only read the introduction of “Secret man”. Social Distance Scale (SDS) and Single-Category Implicit Attitude Test (SC-IAT) were used to test participants’ explicit and implicit attitudes towards the fictitious group. The results indicated that their explicit attitudes have a significant difference but their implicit attitudes haven’t. These findings implied that groups can be influenced negatively by this method of word-building, though a stable negative impression on the group won’t be created immediately.
Thesis advisors: Max van Duijn and Lunde Guo


11.50 - 12.30 BREAK


12.30 - 13.05 Wouter Moraal
Title:Exploring the Impact of Online Privacy Trade-offs on Cognitive Function
Abstract: This research combines the findings from behavioural economics that monetary trade-offs can diminish cognitive function for people with certain characteristics, and from psychological privacy research that lower cognitive function can result in giving away more data online. From this combination the question is formed whether online privacy trade-offs can affect cognitive function, inhibitory control specifically, in certain circumstances. From the recent findings on the concepts that affect how people choose to act in the context of information disclosure, it is hypothesized that the sensitivity of the information at hand might be an important factor of influence. Also other relations between factors are hypothesized and looked into. The results show no practically or statistically significant effect of the hypothesized variables on cognitive function. However, other effects and mediations are uncovered or reaffirmed.
Thesis advisors: Max van Duijn and Hadi Asghari


13.15 - 13.50 Miguel George Castello Mira
Title:Extrapolating lessons for future Cinematic Virtual Reality creators by looking at current and past attempts at creating Virtual Reality
Abstract: The for most objective of this thesis is to formalize the most current and recent lessons from Cinematic Virtual Reality (or CVR). In order to do so it was first researched what makes CVR or 360 Film its own unique subsection of Virtual Reality (or VR). This was done by comprehending, the history of the medium, and also its current state. By doing so we may separate CVR as its own subsection of VR. Once this subsection is defined, we may extrapolate lessons from the advice of current CVR directors for future CVR directors to adhere to. (Such as diegetic spectator). As such, this thesis’s first focus is on the history of VR. The second focus is on the zeitgeist of CVR and where it currently is as a medium. The third and final focus is on what current directors and content creators have learned form their experiences when creating for this medium.  With these three primary focuses we may establish a basis for the very first CVR lessons. 
Thesis advisors: Bas Haring and Steye Hallema

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Posted: 22 June 2018 01:35 PM   [ # 2 ]
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14.00 - 14.35 Maral Gurbanzade
Title:“Trust me if you can” - Exploratory study on the effects of anthropomorphism in embodied social robots on self-disclosure of users in dyadic communication
Abstract: This study researches the effect that the appearance of the humanoid design has on the amount and depth of self-disclosure in human users in a dyadic dialogue and the preference for presence or absence of anthropomorphism in relation to the personality of the user. 43 adults were randomly assigned to two groups for a one-time verbal dyadic interview, initiated by either a humanoid robot NAO (n=22) or an abstract robot prototype MAO (n=21). Both conditions employed a 10-item measure of the Five-Factor (Big 5) personality dimensions before the conversation, and the Godspeed (I-V) questionnaire after. The interview followed a strict script, consisting of 11 cycles of robot’s self-disclosure, prompt, respondent’s answer, and a closer, with addressed themes incrementally rising in intimacy levels, from introductory (low - 0) to very personal (very high - 3). Both robots were controlled remotely via the Wizard of Oz technique. Double-blind assessment of the intimacy depth was carried out by two independent judges, based on the Disclosure Intimacy Rating Scale (DIRS). Intimacy score results of both groups were measured against the perception of agent’s anthropomorphism, animacy, and perceived intelligence for the first hypothesis and the likeability of the agent in relation to the personality type of the user for the second.
Thesis advisors: Edwin van der Heide and Joost Broekens


14.45 - 15.20 Kaan Koyuncu
Title:An Analysis of Artistic Research Published in Online Journals based on Henk Borgdorff’s Body of Work
Abstract: When does an artistic practice qualify as research? And if so, what kind of knowledge and understanding does it generate? Is there a methodological framework that contextualizes methods and techniques for artistic research? How can we differentiate artistic research from other academic disciplines? This thesis investigates the emerging field of artistic research and seeks to answer those questions by using the theoretical framework proposed by Henk Borgdorff. This framework scrutinizes the field in an ontological, epistemological and methodological way. After studying the field in depth, we introduce an online peer-reviewed journal called The Journal for Artistic Research (JAR) and selected three unique artistic research publications. We analyze and discuss them in the light chosen framework. We do this with the aim to create an actual picture of the artistic research field and its often promising, thought-provoking results.
Thesis advisors: Edwin van der Heide and Henk Borgdorff


15.30 - 16.05 Caspar Silvester
Title: Music as Strategy for Memorizing Objective Time
Abstract: In this research the human ability for objective timing is investigated.
Although humans are very capable of performing tasks that require precise timing, such as walking and talking, we are not able to reproduce abstract timing intervals from (long-term) memory with great accuracy. In contrast, most of us are able to recollect our favourite musical pieces from memory, with only slight deviations in tempo. This suggests musical cognition and musical memory are somehow different from cognition and memory for other stimuli.  This research tries to prove musical segmentation strategies are helpful in accurately reproducing and comparing timing intervals.
Thesis adviser: Edwin van der Heide

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Posted: 22 June 2018 01:49 PM   [ # 3 ]
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room 1.11


09.00 - 09.35 Anna Chocholi
Title:Pursuing pleasure through fear: Can being scared in the virtual world actually make you happier in real life?”
Abstract: Fear has been at the center of emotion research since its birth. It is considered a valuable emotion, evolved to provide protection and incentive to escape from potential danger. However, humans as master-toolmakers have created novel avenues through which they could manipulate those archaic functions and through this, the experience of emotion has fallen under the bounds of vise. But why is it that we actually enjoy emotions that are supposed to be unpleasant? Can it be because this dialectic experience of intensely good and intensely bad emotions is not that different in respect to their underlying mechanisms? The excitation transfer theory offers a plausible explanation for this intriguing phenomenon. It is stated that once a person is physiologically aroused due to an excitatory event, this arousal persists after its termination and can facilitate a subsequent elicited emotion in an additive manner. This study aims to explore the utility of Virtual Reality for fear/anxiety induction and therefore, the generation of arousal. It is hypothesized that if a person is aroused through Virtual Reality techniques, this arousal can promote the experience of a closely following real-life event. Specifically, it is examined whether immersive fear/anxiety can be afterward transposed into laughter. Along the lines of the current research’s requirements, a Virtual Reality horror game was created. The game was designed aiming at invoking the desired emotional experience at a moderate level by the means of threat suggestion. Thereafter, participants actively engaged in a laughter session in which they were asked to audibly and with increasing speed, read a set of tongue-twister rhymes interchangeably with the author. Additionally, a control condition was tested in which participants were asked to play the same video game in a desktop format while the rest of the experimental setup remained unchanged. Throughout the experimental practice, arousal-related data derived from skin conductance measures where gathered. Furthermore, self-report data referring to perceived arousal and valence before the onset of the experiment, after the gameplay and subsequent to the laughter session were collected. A total of forty-six individuals participated in the current study of which twenty-seven engaged in the VR condition and nineteen in the control condition respectively.
Thesis advisors: Peter van der Putten and Roberta Sellaro


09.45 - 10.20 Matei Szabo
Title: “Sound and shape: implementing findings from crossmodal research”
Abstract: Cross-modal correspondence research typically studies the association between shape and sound in separate experiments. This research aimed to explore these associations when they are integrated into a single form. Characteristics like acuteness, brightness and size of shapes were used as variables for creating an animated shape in an interactive questionnaire. Participants were asked to choose one shape out of three which they found most appropriate for the sound they heard. Analysis of the data shows that certain variables were weakly but significantly correlated to sound features, while others could not be predicted. These results provide a framework for further research both from a scientific and artistic angle.
Thesis advisors: Peter van der Putten and Edwin van der Heide


10.30 - 11.05 Thiago Elid Della Monica
Title: “Instagram Happiness Index”
Abstract: Reflecting on social media behaviour, the primary motivation is to analyse user’s Instagram persona by collecting, measuring and interpreting the data about happiness on Instagram. The main idea is to analyse how people portray happiness in the online photo-video-sharing social network based on the Geneva Emotion Wheel. Having the idea of developing a brand-new index in mind, the exploratory work consists of taking the top 11 languages by number of native speakers and make a list of countries that speak those languages. As a result, it is possible to build and rank a full list of countries and then compare the Instagram Happiness Index (IHI) to other accepted metrics for happiness such as the most reliable and prestigious of them, the World Happiness Report (WHR) and by running a correlation test, verify whether there is any association between them.
Thesis advisors: Peter van der Putten and Ruut Veenhoven

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Posted: 22 June 2018 01:58 PM   [ # 4 ]
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room 1.11


11.15 - 11.50 Maarten van Hees
Title: Disciples of the Heinous Path: Social network structure and genre hierarchy in Heavy Metal
Abstract: Organization of social networks has been studied extensively viewed through the lens of inter-personal relations. However, the aim of this exploratory study is to find if there are different, domain-specific factors in play influencing the structure of the social network. As a case study, an extensive data-set from Encyclopaedia Metallum, a Heavy Metal band archive, was used to test the hypothesis whether or not the social network structure is influenced by a hierarchy of genres. Attempts were made to re-categorize bands according to genre and to counter the fluid nature of the data, after which hierarchical clustering was performed, using the number of shared artists between bands as distance metric. A range of histograms where generated to gain insight into the distribution of genres, along with a colored dendrogram to see how genre distribution converges. Unfortunately, the results remain inconclusive. A number of issues have been identified to address in future research.
Thesis advisors: Maarten Lamers and Peter van der Putten


11.50 - 12.30 BREAK


12.30 - 13.05 Maik Lanen
Title:Virtual Reality as a Context for Memorizing: It Can Make a Difference
Abstract: In this research 51 participants of Dutch origin performed three memory tasks either in the context of virtual reality or reality. Twenty-four hours later they were tested under the same or different conditions. The main result found in this research is that the groups without a context change scored significantly higher on the overall score than the groups without the context change. The result imply that it is much more debatable if we can use learning in virtual reality on real life situations whereby the ability to recall plays a role. Another finding is that the context group virtual reality - reality scored much lower on the overall score than the rest of the groups. After a comparison between the virtual reality - reality group and the reality - virtual reality group, we found an almost statistical difference, which results in a non-statistical effect that stays unexplained. 
Thesis advisors: Maarten Lamers and Jasper Schelling


13.15 - 13.50 Lucia Martin Holguin
Title:Communicating AI through Newspapers: Where is the Real Danger?”
Abstract: This study is researching how newspapers are portraying the impact of Artificial Intelligence. Taking into account the social and economical context where these new developments have been done, the research analysed articles from four english spoken newspaper. First It looks for the ‘voices’ or sources that journalist are relying on when writing on this issue and secondly It analysed the articles more in depth to uncover how the narratives and discourses around the impact of AI are being constructed in the news.
Thesis advisors: Maarten Lamers and Imar de Vries


14.00 - 14.35 Pinhsien Lee
Title:Bring you closer to me: does visually co-located video-mediated-communication draw more attention to the conversation?
Abstract: Video-mediated-communication is becoming part of human’s social life, just like telephone once was. This research is focus on the background visual cue of video calling and its influence on VMC. The aim of this study is to see if bringing the talking object into the subject’s own surrounding (i.e. object’s background in VMC is synchronizing with subject’s environment.) could increase people’s attention level on the conversation; therefore, bring the experience and the quality of the communication over webcam to a higher level. The experiment was built in an online website, where subjects could have a simulated video in the same way as they have video-calls in real life.
Thesis advisors: Maarten Lamers and Marcello Gómez Maureira

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Posted: 22 June 2018 02:04 PM   [ # 5 ]
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room 1.11


14.45 - 15.20 Yanni Xiong
Title:Gamified Learning: Using Narrative to Enhance Second Language Learning
Abstract: Gamification, defined as utilizing game elements in non-game contexts, has been applied in different ways within various fields. Many researchers have investigated the effectiveness of gamification in education and have found useful effects, such as improving competence need satisfaction and learning efficiency. Strong evidence suggests that narrative can be useful in improving the motivation for learning and connected outcomes. However, the application of narrative as a gamification element has not been studied yet. This research focuses on narrative as one type of gamification and investigates its impact in a language learning case study. 48 participants were invited to learn the artificial, minimalistic language “Toki Pona”. Participants were divided into two groups, with one group learning with narrative elements and one without. The results show no significant difference that narrative can function as a gamification element for language learning, although the test score of experimental group is slightly higher. The paper discusses possible explanations, as well as potential improvements of the experiment.
Thesis advisors: Fons Verbeek and Marcello Gómez Maureira


15.30 - 16.05 Sieta van Horck
Title:Plant Resonance: an exploration of the effects of musical stimulation on plant well-being
Abstract: Inspired by a series of remarkable experiments summarized in the 1975 publication ‘The Secret Life of the Plants’, this project explores the effects of musical stimulation on plant-well being. In order to explore if audio frequency either stimulates cell growth or cause cell degradation in Glyceria Maxima plants, the performance of Plant-microbial-fuel-cells are analyzed under three conditions: (1) Indian Vedic music (2) Classic Rock music and (3) a control group. The experiments are evaluated in terms of difficulties, data are analyzed, results presented, and research obstacles are investigated and acknowledged. The combined results show that plants in the control group performed best. However, results also provide indications that the frequencies in Indian Vedic music positively influence plant growth, whereas classic rock causes atrophy - suggesting that plants respond not only to well known environmental patterns like sunlight, but also to structured patterns in audio frequency.
Thesis adviser: Fons Verbeek

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