Public Graduation Presentations Friday, August 25
Posted: 18 August 2017 04:50 PM
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You’re all invited to the Public Graduation Presentations of Cors Brinkman, Robin Bergman, Sander de Bont, Gleb Satyukov, Dan Xu, Helena Frijns, Jasper Schelling, Haoran Ding, Veneta Andersen, Emily Klerks, Matthijs Hilgers, Petra Kubernatova, Matthijs Theelen.



Friday, August 25, 2017


Parallel sessions in Gravensteen Building room 1.11 and room 0.11, Pieterskerkhof 6,  2311 SR, Leiden.


Schedule room 1
.11

10.00 – 10.35 Cors Brinkman

10.45 – 11.20 Robin Bergman
11.30 – 12.05 Emily Klerks

12.05 – 12.40 BREAK

12.40 – 13.15 Gleb Satyukov
13.25 – 14.00 Dan Xu
14.10 – 14.45 Helena Frijns

14.55 – 15.30 Jasper Schelling
15.40 – 16.15 Haoran Ding


Schedule room 0.11

13.25 – 14.00 Matthijs Hilgers
14.10 – 14.45 Petra Kubernatova
14.55 – 15.30 Veneta Andersen

15.40 – 16.15 Matthijs Theelen

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room 1.11

10.00 – 10.35 Cors Brinkman
Title:The Truth, The Whole Truthiness and Nothing But Alternative Facts
Abstract: “Truthiness” is the belief in what you feel to be true rather than what the facts will support. This concept was introduced by television host Stephen Colbert during a TV episode of The Colbert Report in 2005, warning the viewer about the risks of simply accepting arguments and information because they appeal to their emotions. More than a decade later the Oxford English Dictionary voted Post-truth as Word of the Year 2016 as an adjective ‘relating to or denoting circumstances in which objective facts are less influential in shaping public opinion than appeals to emotion and personal belief’. 
People support their post-truth claims by using ‘alternative facts’ to convince others. In itself the expression ‘alternative fact’ comes across as contradictory, but it simply means competing facts. In politics, alternative facts typically do not match reality. As a result they are mostly perceived as falsehoods, lies or bullshit. In contrast to politics, alternative facts in science are completely viable, they can be commonly found in the form of different theories as they fit our prior beliefs on how the world works or are consistent with our observations on everyday life. 
The author is fascinated by construction of truth of the individual and the way alternative facts have the ability to alter the perception thereof. By doing literary research and using photographic manipulation the author hopes to achieve a better understanding of the term alternative facts. The goal of this explorative study is to translate both the political and scientific alternative fact into visual presentations to be experienced by a broader audience. By changing the point of view, people can experience an alternative truth. 
Thesis advisors: Bas Haring and M.E.N van den Heuvel



10.45 – 11.20 Robin Bergman
Title:Exploring Technological Futures – The use of different media: text, physical object or hybrid
Abstract: Conscious and unconscious, humans wear, live and interact with technology. Human development regarding social and cultural evolution is closely linked to technological advances. Whether or not technologies will impact our society in a beneficial way is determined by political, social and economic dimensions. Academic research within various fields indicate that speculation about future technologies provides a fundamental tool for successful technological development and implementation. Where the use of fiction and speculation within text and speech has been a classical medium for exploration, recent developments within the field of design highlight the protagonist role of the spectator regarding the physical object. This research generates insights into the usage of different media forms: the physical object, the written medium and a hybrid of both media. Testing whether the chosen media causes the subjects to explore and enlarge the understanding of technological futures from multiple dimensions. For this research a technological frame is explored regarding the future of the emerging technology the ‘artificial womb’. Therefore, a text, a physical object and a hybrid form are developed in order to investigate if there are differences and similarities in the experience of the spectator between the media. Explorative qualitative research is conducted to analyse the experiences of the test subjects. In addition, a comparative case study is made between the media forms to compare in which case the subject experienced technological futures explicated through social, economic and political dimensions. In this way the paper contributes to the exploration of our future.
Thesis advisors: Bas Haring and James Auger


11.30 – 12.05 Emily Klerks
Title: “Sensory Information about Reading Progress on the E-reader”
Abstract: In this study, we test whether sensory information about reading progress can serve as a memory index to readers to improve their memory of the text. Two prototypes that provide readers with information about their reading progress while they are reading on the e-reader have been developed for this study. One prototype makes use of visual elements on the screen, and another of a haptic interface on the back of the e-reader. Test results of memory tests and and qualitative data suggest the visual elements do not have a strong effect on the reading experience. The haptic interface faces some usability challenges, but shows promising ability to provide readers with a haptic memory index during reading.
Thesis advisors: Max van Duijn and Fons Verbeek


12.05 – 12.40 BREAK

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Posted: 18 August 2017 04:59 PM   [ # 1 ]
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room 1.11

12.40 – 13.15 Gleb Satyukov
Title:Effects of asking questions in conversational user interfaces
Abstract: Increasing popularity of conversational user interfaces has led to the omnipresent chatbot. With a wide range of practical purposes - from virtual assistants to customer service - these bots are extremely useful in helping users in a natural conversation. Designed to convincingly simulate human behavior in a conversation these bots often succeed in fooling us, thereby passing the Turing test.  Applying various tricks such as arbitrarily delayed replies, elaborate conversational intents and personalized responses they manage to keep up the illusion of sentience. But is that the best they can do?
In this research we focused on the effects of chatbots asking questions while performing a relatively common task. The experiment is disguised as a game where the players can chat with RAM-z - chef of the robot cuisine. Participants are invited to provide step-by-step instructions on how to make a grilled ham and cheese sandwich. Depending on assigned condition the robot chef would alter it’s responses to include a specific question, a generalized question or no question at all. Design of the game and the execution of the experiment are discussed in detail, as well as the resulting data and the interpretation thereof. Discoveries made during the experiment and potential improvements to the conversational user interfaces in general are addressed.


Thesis advisors: Bas Haring and Fenna Poletiek


13.25 – 14.00 Dan Xu
Title:Hearing augmented body: an exploration of different mapping strategies of audio feedback for postural control” 
Abstract: In natural environment, almost all events generate stimulations to multiple sense modalities. Our brain combines and integrates information from different sensory systems to form a robust perception. Not only does natural congruent sensory signals would enhance the perception of certain event, the brain is also capable of interpreting and utilising the relevant information detected by artificial sensors and fed back cross different sensory modalities. Providing additional information about human movements has shown positive effects on improving motor control and enhancing motor learning. Movement sonification refers to the process that kinematic or dynamic information is represented by synthetic sounds. However, there are millions of ways one could map movement data to sound parameters. The association between these two dimensions still remains rather elusive. In this study, a vowel based sonification was developed as the audio feedback for postural control and experiments have been conducted to explore different mapping strategies. 


Thesis advisors: Edwin van der Heide and Alberto Boem


14.10 – 14.45 Helena Frijns
Title:Body Language for Bots: Adapting a virtual robot’s gestures by means of Interactive Evolutionary Computation
Abstract: Robots find application in contexts as diverse as retail, factory work and elderly care. In these situations, it is important that robots can communicate with humans, indicate that they understood messages and adapt their behaviour to a changing environment. A robot’s nonverbal communication has been shown to have an effect on human task performance and the perception of the interaction with the robot. This raises the question whether we can adapt a robot’s behaviour based on the effectiveness of its communication towards humans. We explored the use of Interactive Evolutionary Computation to develop gestures for a virtual robot. In addition, we investigated if and how Interactive Evolutionary Computation can be suitable for the development of gestures for robots.


Thesis advisors: Maarten Lamers and Tessa Verhoef

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Posted: 18 August 2017 05:05 PM   [ # 2 ]
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room 1.11


14.55 – 15.30 Jasper Schelling
Title: Mining for Insight: An exploration of data-driven research methodologies in a design research context
Abstract: In contemporary design practice the incorporation of research-based methods has become commonplace, and a logical part of the design proces. Designers have incorporated qualitative research methods from the social sciences into the design proces in order to get a better understanding of what to design instead of designing what was asked for. Their adaptation of these research methods led to a better understanding of the social, cognitive and emotional needs of people. Traditionally this highly qualitative research is carried out using small groups of participants in order to facilitate and enhance the understanding of designers . Modern digital products and services are fundamentally quantitative in nature. As such, their usage inherently generates data about how a product is being used. With successful products and services seeing usage in the order of millions of users, designers are currently not equipped with the knowledge or research skills to make sense and understand how their products and services are being used at this scale. In order to discover how data-driven research methodologies can be applied within a design research context, starting from the frame of a design researcher, We’ve explored the opportunities provided by data science methodologies. The research is contextualised through a data analysis and modelling case study that was executed in collaboration with a third party organisation. We discuss the tooling created in order to conduct the case study, as well as research results and insights that were gathered using this approach, and the validity of the predictive models created. Finally we reflect on the impact that the adaptation of data-driven research methods can have on design research activities in a research-through-design context.
Thesis advisors: Peter van der Putten and Ingrid Mulder


15.40 – 16.15 Haoran Ding
Title:Computational Plot Planning: A Temporal Social Network Approach
Abstract: Computational story generation is an important topic and challenge of AI and Computational Creativity. In this study, we introduce a new approach to computational plot planning using a neural network model. Trained with the temporal social network data of a story, the Artificial Neural Network model attempts to predict the network structure in the upcoming story (future interactions between characters). In the presentation, we will discuss the structure of the model and its results on the different story datasets, as well as future directions and applications.
Thesis advisors: Frank Takes, Pádraig Mac Carron and Maarten Lamers

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Posted: 18 August 2017 05:20 PM   [ # 3 ]
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Schedule room 0.11

13.25 – 14.00 Matthijs Hilgers
Title:Using bicoloured text to improve reading abilities and experience
Abstract: In hopes of finding a new way to improve reading abilities or experience, we researched, from a gestalt-design point of view, the effects of bicoloured text; texts where some words are coloured grey instead of black, so to separate them and make for easier interpretation. Our findings show indications that marking function words, sans auxiliary verbs, grey in Dutch could lead to a better understanding of texts.
Thesis adviser: Max van Duijn


14.10 – 14.45 Petra Kubernatova
Title:: “Knowledge at first sight: Building a model for a data visualization recommender system suited for non-expert users
Abstract: In today’s age, there are huge amounts of data being generated every second of every day. Through data visualization, humans can explore, analyse and present it. Choosing a suitable visualization for our data is a difficult task, especially for non-experts. Current data visualization recommender systems exist to aid in choosing a visualization, yet suffer from issues such as low accessibility and indecisiveness. The aim of this study is to create a model for a data visualization recommender system for non-experts that resolves these issues. Based on previous work and a survey among members of data science communities, requirements for a new model were put together. The result is a question-based model that uses a decision tree and a custom data visualization classification hierarchy in order to recommend a visualization. Furthermore, it incorporates task-driven and data characteristics-driven perspectives. Based on testing of the model against existing solutions, it is shown that the new model reaches similar accuracy while being more simple, clear, versatile, extendable and transparent. The model can be applied for example within data visualization software development or as part of a learning tool. It is also suitable as a platform for experimentation with machine learning and natural language processing techniques.
Thesis advisors: Max van Duijn and Magda Friedjungová


14.55 – 15.30 Veneta Andersen
Title: “The Emotions of a Painted Face: Analyzing British Portraiture Art from The Tudors to Victorian Era”
Abstract: This study uses an emotion face recognition algorithm to detect and measure the six basic human emotions (anger, contempt, disgust, fear, happiness, sadness, and surprise), and neutral, as defined by an Ekman classifier, in British portraiture art between 1500 and 1910. Only single-sitter portrait paintings are considered for the analysis, and the images are taken from the collection of The National Portrait Gallery in London. The analyzed images include examples from Tudor and Elizabethan period, Stuart Portraits and the Civil War, Georgian and Regency Portraits, up to the Victorian and Edwardian portraits (1910). The research examines how the emotion recognition measurements might correlate to the historical events within the periods of their making, and seeks a dominant emotion by sitter, by gender, by painter, and by art historical period. Only single sitter, neutral background, oil painted portraits are considered, a study by Karolina Nurzynska has shown that the texture of an image might affect the emotion measurements obtained. The curatorial classifications of the portraits have been taken into consideration in the evaluation.
Thesis advisors: Fons Verbeek and Michael van Hoogenhuyze


15.40 – 16.15 Matthijs Theelen
Title: Design guidelines for educational artefacts supporting physiotherapist treatments
Abstract: The use of artefacts to support education in medicine and to practice medical procedures is becoming increasingly popular. Through the use of technology in an educational setting, medical procedures can be practiced on artefacts in safe environments. However, for physiotherapists there seem to be very few of these artefacts available, even though they have the potential to deliver direct feedback on a student’s actions and provide a multipurpose and adaptive learning experience. In this exploratory study we have developed five guidelines to aid in the design of such artefacts, through the creation and evaluation of a prototypical artefact. This prototype was created via the rapid prototyping method and was tested by 28 students to evaluate and re-evaluate its usability and user interaction. Furthermore, experience practitioners confirmed that artefacts such as the evaluated prototype offer a meaningful addition to current educational practices, leading to new, meaningful opportunities for future research. 
Thesis advisors: Fons Verbeek and Carolien Teunisse

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