Public Graduation Presentations, Friday, June 23
Posted: 15 June 2017 04:23 PM
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You’re all invited to the Public Graduation Presentations of Adiel Ghafoerkhan, Jelger Kroese, Pieter Rohrbach, Riccardo Martorana, Rick Henneveld, Hélène Trommelen.
Location: Gravensteen Building room 0.11, Pieterskerkhof 6, 2311 SR, Leiden

10.00 – 10.35 Adiel Ghafoerkhan
10.45 – 11.20 Jelger Kroese
11.30 – 12.05 Pieter Rohrbach
12.15 – 12.50 Riccardo Martorana

12.50 – 13.25 BREAK

13.25 – 14.00 Rick Henneveld
14.10 – 14.45 Hélène Trommelen


10.00 – 10.35 Adiel Ghafoerkhan
Title: “Mood Journaling: An Exploration Of Real Time Mood Developments As A Function Of Heart Rate”
Abstract: Mood jounaling applications are a way to track and log feelings and moods. Through reminders they give you prompts to log and assess your mood. But these reminders do not occur when the mood actually changes; just randomly or at preset times. Research shows that people can only accurately describe these changes 10 to 15 seconds after they experience them. This paper explores the possibility of heart rate as an indicator of mood developments in real time. Thirty-nine participants watched a set of negative and positive rated pictures and were asked to fill in a mood assessment questionnaire when their heart rate went above a certain threshold.  We expect to find that heart rate is somewhat sensitive to mood developments with some participants.
Thesis advisors: Edwin van der Heide, Marcello Gómez Maureira

10.45 – 11.20 Jelger Kroese
Title: “An interactive plant as a learning interface: embodying environmental education in the natural environment”
Abstract: Research into environmental education has showed two components to be important predictors of its effectiveness: a cognitive and an affective component. Cognitive learning usually takes place in a classroom setting and is about developing knowledge about environmental issues and methods to counter them. Affective learning mainly happens by physically experiencing nature and is about developing a sense of connectedness with nature. We present an innovative approach that integrates those two methods of learning in a free-choice learning setting. We augmented a living plant with interactive functionalities. By touching the plant, people can engage in a playful interactive dialogue that aims to teach them about the plant and its environment. It is hypothesized that this direct form of interaction positively impacts learning, because it enables an experience where people receive cognitive information, while they have an affective multisensory experience of nature. To test this, a study was done in a botanic garden. Two conditions were compared where visitors had the possibility to navigate through an interactive story by either (1) directly interacting with our “interactive plant”, or (2) interacting with a tablet device that was placed in front of a plant. A pre-posttest design including observational measures was used with a sample of 37 visitors of a botanic garden in the Netherlands. Results show that both the tablet device and the “interactive plant” had a positive effect on the learning outcome. They further show that the group that interacted with the “interactive plant” showed a significantly higher increase in scores on the multiple-choice questions, than the group that interacted with the tablet device. It seems that this difference in scores can be only partly explained by the time that participants chose to interact with the test setup. A bigger sample is needed to further assess the impact of direct interaction on free-choice learning at a botanic garden.
Thesis advisors: Edwin van der Heide, Anne Land

11.30 – 12.05 Pieter Rohrbach
Title: “Passively Listening to Music and Social Bonding: The Role of Music and Musical Reactivity on Giving in Trust Games”
There is evidence to suggest that music making can facilitate bonding, so that we cooperate more effectively and more easily manage our increasingly complex social networks. Whether this is true for passively listening to music is still unclear. A pilot study was conducted to investigate the effect of listening to music on perceived closeness between others as well as to investigate the role of musical reactivity. Listening to music did not significantly increase the extent to which people judge others as bonded, contradicting earlier research. Nevertheless, musical reactivity could predict bonding scores, indicating that if emotions are evoked in listeners, they are more inclined to judge others as close. A second experiment was developed to study whether people trust and bond with a stranger more quickly if music is present. Self-report as well as behavioral measurements, a version of the trust game, are used. The trust game is used in a new way, so that participants are convincingly fooled into playing with a real player, while all experimental control is maintained. Results have yet to be obtained.
Thesis advisors: Max van Duijn, Jacques Launay

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Posted: 15 June 2017 04:28 PM   [ # 1 ]
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12.15 – 12.50 Riccardo Martorana
Title: “Representation of Silence in Soundscape Perception”
Abstract: Silence as the absolute absence or opposite of sound is unavailable in nature and it can exist only as an abstract concept. However, the presence of silence in our life as a perceptual experience is undeniable and in order to be perceived it can only exist in the presence of sound. Silence can be considered in terms of a subjective contextual representation of environmental auditory stimuli which in acoustic ecology is studied as ‘soundscape’. The purpose of this research is to study the perceptual-cognitive processes involved in the creation of the subjective mental representation of soundscapes which are perceived, categorized and evaluated as ‘silence’.  This has been done firstly through a review of researches and theories in the field of soundscape perception. Secondly, the information collected have been integrated with an analysis of twenty audio files collected by the MoMA museum in the project Share your Silence and sent by the participants as field recordings of environments subjectively considered as ‘silence’. The interrelation between categorization of sound sources, emotional response and expectation has emerged as a primary determining factor in the representation of soundscape. In view of this aspect a possible ecological function of the perception of silence in the relationship between human being and environment has been discussed and the compatibility between our definition of silence and the eco-field hypothesis and the general theory of resources has been hypothesized. Silence arose as an optimal condition of the environment in which human activities aimed to satisfy personal needs can be accomplished with a low energy cost, as a result of the low difficulty to distinguish, organize and categorize sounds and a low level of ecological competition with other species, groups or individuals.
Thesis advisors: Edwin van der Heide, Almo Farina (Urbino University)


12.50 – 13.25 BREAK


13.25 – 14.00 Rick Henneveld
Title: “Could a synesthetic association training improve reading fluency in children with dyslexia?”
Abstract: Dyslexia is defined as a variable and often familial learning disability involving difficulties in acquiring and processing language that is typically manifested by a lack of proficiency in reading, spelling, and writing. Dyslexia is characterized by the inability to integrate information across multiple areas of the brain. The consequent failure to develop representations of the knowledge on a topic based on its associated attributes results in difficulty in reading. In contrast, synesthesia may be seen as a hyperassociative condition, possibly due to a failure to properly segregate areas into distinct networks. Synesthesia could therefore be regarded as a disorder opposite of dyslexia on a spectrum of a developmental disorder of association. It has been shown that, in some individuals and to a certain extent, synesthesia can be trained. This training could be beneficial for dyslectics. In this study, I provide an overview of the neurodevelopmental aspects of dyslexia, synesthesia and the overlap between these conditions. I review the evidence on synesthetic training in non-dyslexics and hypothesize on the potential benefits of this training in dyslexics. Furthermore, the methods of a study to explore these benefits are proposed.
Thesis advisors: Maarten Lamers, Tessa Verhoef


14.10 – 14.45 Hélène Trommelen
Title: “Analysis of design and effectiveness of a patient self-management app for reducing CAUTI: Participatient case study”
Abstract: Our research addresses the design and implementation of mobile health (mHealth) usability heuristics on the reported usability issues of the Participatient application. This application aims to support urinary catheter related self-management activities in a hospital setting. Based on design heuristics and literature on and decision aids, the prototype was improved with several features: risk information, visualizations, feedback, motivational cues, and improved navigation. In total 25 patients evaluated the application at four stages of development. A total of 76 usability issues were reported and 20 suggestions for improvement were given. The most frequently occurring usability factors were respectively ‘effective use of language’, ‘readability’ and ‘navigation’.  The design heuristics were mapped to the proposed solutions. Improvements were categorized according to the four barriers for older adults: cognitive barriers, motivational issues, Answers to the questionnaire showed that most patients found that using the application positively affected knowledge on infection risks and awareness on the importance on timely removal of a urinary catheter. The results regarding the use of design heuristics indicate that these can be used as a useful tool to address usability issues in older adults.
Thesis advisors: Fons J. Verbeek, Gaby A. Wildenbos, Linda W. Peute

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