Public Graduation Presentations Friday, August 28
Posted: 26 August 2015 02:42 PM
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You’re all invited to the Public Graduation Presentations of Coen Dekker, Georgios Lampropoulos, Sam Verkoelen, Arnaud Loonstra, Lisa Rombout, Brit Hopmann, Polly Oskam, Dirrik Emmen, Donna Piët, Yang Chen, Marcello Gómez Maureira, Beryl Noë, Sabrina Verhage, Livia Teernstra, Jules Verdijk, Bernd Dudzik, Paul Kasteleyn.



Friday, August 28, 2015


Parallel sessions in Academy Building room 01 and room 02, Rapenburg 73,  2311 GJ, Leiden


Schedule room 1

10.00 – 10.35 Coen Dekker

10.45 – 11.20 Georgios Lampropoulos

11.30 – 12.05 Sam Verkoelen

12.05 – 12.40 BREAK

12.40 – 13.15 Arnaud Loonstra

13.25 – 14.00 Lisa Rombout

14.10 – 14.45 Brit Hopmann

14.45 - 14.55 BREAK


14.55 – 15.30 Polly Oskam

15.40 – 16.15 Dirrik Emmen


Schedule room 2

10.00 – 10.35 Donna Piët

10.45 – 11.20 Yang Chen

11.30 – 12.05 Marcello Gómez Maureira

12.05 – 12.40 BREAK

12.40 – 13.15 Beryl Noë

13.25 – 14.00 Sabrina Verhage

14.10 – 14.45 Livia Teernstra

14.45 - 14.55 BREAK


14.55 – 15.30 Jules Verdijk

15.40 – 16.15 Bernd Dudzik
16.25 - 17.00 Paul Kasteleyn


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room 1


10.00 – 10.35 Coen Dekker 

Title: “The impact of movie soundtracks on the estimation of driving speeds”


Abstract: Music can be experienced in a variety of ways, but it also has a number of effects while it is perceived. We researched to what extent movie soundtracks impact the estimation of driving speed. We approached this question with a realistic experiment consisting of driving videos with the addition of soundtracks. A total of 96 participants joined, half offline and half online. The experiment consisted of three videos (40, 60 and 80 km/h) presented in four ways: with no soundtrack or with either anger, happiness and sadness soundtrack. Video sets were shuffled per participant. Results of the research present that all selected soundtrack significantly raised the speed estimation the 40 km/h video. The other two speed estimations were not significantly influenced by soundtrack. Overall the influence of the anger and happiness soundtrack tended to draw the speed estimates to a central point, instead of influencing linear.


Thesis advisors: Edwin van der Heide and Cynthia Liem



10.45 – 11.20 Georgios Lampropoulos
Title: “Learning choreography through visual perspective-taking
Abstract: The current research studies the effect of visual perspective-taking in the task of learning a choreography. The research was based on the assumption that perspective-taking has positive effects on human cognition. It has been proven useful for passing knowledge from an expert and can be applied visually, in a virtual environment. This research intends to determine perspective-taking’ s effect in the area of dance. It focuses on the task of learning a choreography and how this could be assimilated in a virtual dance environment. For this reason, an experiment was designed to test the participants’ capacity to learn a choreography from two different perspectives(allocentric and egocentric). We investigated the user performance and experience regarding the aforementioned perspectives, including measurements such as time, user confidence and spatial awareness. The research concluded that there was no significant difference in terms of learning time between the two different perspectives. In the case of user experience, the allocentric approach felt more natural and people were more aware of the movement.
Thesis advisors: Edwin van der Heide and Peter van der Putten


11.30 – 12.05 Sam Verkoelen
Title:Exploring dimensionality reduction on semi-structured photos — a closer look at Exactitudes
Abstract: Deep learning or dimensionality reduction has shown unprecedented results in contemporary researches. However, these systems are often referred to as black boxes. This exploratory research will look at dimensionality reduction via Restricted Boltzmann Machines in a set of small experiments. These experiments where performed on the semi structured photos of the exactitudes project, resulting in novel insights and visualisations on how to extract meaningful information from a deep learning system. These insights do not only help to understand how such a system works and what it learns, but it also provides a picture of the underlaying structure of the dataset.
Thesis advisors: Maarten Lamers and Peter van Putten


12.05 – 12.40 BREAK

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Posted: 26 August 2015 02:54 PM   [ # 1 ]
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room 1


12.40 – 13.15 Arnaud Loonstra
Title:Concurrency for Creative Coding
Abstract: Programming for multiple processors is a challenging task. Approaches to program concurrently require a thorough understanding of the computer. Not all people who program possess this. However, as processors are not getting faster, everybody will need to program concurrently eventually. Creative Coding is the practice of programming for being expressive. In this research we propose an easy framework for Creative Coders to program concurrently based on a paradigm of interacting entities. The proposed framework is tested on a group of Creative Coders. The research confirms that concurrent programming is very challenging, that concurrent programs require a different design and that users find it easier to program using the proposed framework.
Thesis advisors: Maarten Lamers and Wan J. Fokkink


13.25 – 14.00 Lisa Rombout
Title:Real-world versus Virtual Reality Treatment Simulations
Abstract: Placebo treatments are known as the comparison baseline in scientific research. The effects of placebos are real and can be beneficial for our health, but not many people would like being prescribed one by their health care provider without their knowledge. However, it has been shown that so-called open-label placebos, where the patient is aware of the treatment being only a simulation, can still work. This study focuses on these open-label treatment simulations and explores whether they have to be performed in the real world, or can also take place in virtual reality. A virtual reality treatment simulation can easily be optimized and accessed by patients at their leisure. But are virtual placebos real enough to trick ourselves?
Thesis advisors: Maarten Lamers and Bernhard Hommel


14.10 – 14.45 Brit Hopmann
Title:Visualizing the Invisible: Deep Reading and a New Republic of Letters
Abstract: We can only read a particular amount of text in our life times. Today, there is more information available than ever before, thanks to technology that influenced the production of information as well as how we find, access and retrieve it.
The current study investigates how and to what extent we can combine close and distant reading strategies to maximize our understanding of historical resources in a Digital Humanities context. In particular, we look into the possibilities of visualization to support deep reading.
As an area of application we have chosen a corpus of 17th-century correspondences of scholars residing in the Dutch Republic. We hope to show how visualization can help a Digital Humanities researcher to discover what is ‘hidden between the lines’ of 20,000 letters.
Thesis advisors:  Jaap van den Herik and Charles van den Heuvel

14.45 - 14.55 BREAK

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Posted: 26 August 2015 03:02 PM   [ # 2 ]
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room 1


14.55 – 15.30 Polly Oskam
Title:Introducing a Tablet to non speaking adults with a severe form of Autism Spectrum Disorder; an exploratory study
Abstract: Research of the usability of Tablets for people within the Autism Spectrum Disorder (ASD) is mainly directed towards children. The emphasis is on communication and early intervention. Remarkably the adults with a severe form of ASD (often in combination with other mental disabilities) are rarely the subject of research. For our research we were in the position to work with five non speaking adults with a severe form of ASD. We call them participants. They were introduced to a Tablet. Simple games for toddlers were used to teach them the workings of the touch-based interface. One of the goals was to see whether they were able to solve straight forward jigsaw puzzles without any help. We analyzed the observations of our research and investigated to what extent tablets could be used for testing the abilities and intelligence of children and adults with severe form of ASD.
Thesis supervisors: Jaap van den Herik and C. Rieffe  


15.40 – 16.15 Dirrik Emmen
Title:Checkmate! The willingness to accept computer aid
Abstract: This paper focusses on how willing people are to accept a solution from a computer in different sorts of interactions. It focusses on why people want to rely on different sorts of aid from a computer. Next to this it investigates if people will take the effort to find a better solution than the one given by the computer. In order to create different sorts of computer aid a model is proposed that helps in classifying human machine interaction. Chess puzzles were used in an experiment in which different sorts of computer assistants never gave the optimal solution. Results showed that the sort of interaction related to the usage of the assistant. Lastly, it was found that puzzle complexity, chess proficiency, trust towards machines, and the experienced fun had an effect on the use of the different computer assistants.
Thesis supervisors: Maarten Lamers and Maaike Harbers

 

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Posted: 26 August 2015 03:21 PM   [ # 3 ]
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room 2

10.00 – 10.35 Donna Piët
Title:An Exploration of the Phenomenon of Key-Containers
Abstract: The universal need to order the world around us is the driving force behind the formation of mental categories and concepts, as well as the formation of physical categories in the form of tidying and organising our environment. This often results in systematic groupings of items in homes, for example, in containers. Containers containing keys may be seen as an anomaly to this pattern, often containing a conglomeration of seemingly unrelated items. In this study a number of mostly qualitative methods, including cultural domain analysis and grounded theory, were used to define and explore the cultural concept of ‘key-containers’. These methods were embedded in thirteen extended interviews. The results show that the items in key-containers often consist of two opposing types: valuable  and useful items, and useless junk. Additionally, a strong sense of embarrassment was observed, with very condescending terms used to describe the contents of the containers. An analysis of the findings concludes that the items in the container are marginal items which elude normal classification systems. They are also items in a state of transience, and strongly characterised by their functionality. Keys are central to these containers because they are the epitome of marginal items in a state of transience, as well as, quite literally, the ‘key’ to controlling the transition in and out of the home, and in and out of the marginal state of the streets. This state of marginality can be seen as uncomfortable to the agent, and combining these objects in a container is a coping mechanism aimed at temporarily resolving the uncertainty it causes. Therefore, when confronted with the anomalous items, and thereby their own avoidance-behaviour, participants express discomfort. The container is seen as a symbol for disorder in the home, causing embarrassment, which the participants express by describing the container as something they do not consciously control, and speaking of it condescendingly. 
Thesis supervisors: Bas Haring and Felix Ameka 


10.45 – 11.20 Yang Chen
Title:An Illusory Control Experience: Catch It!
Abstract: In exploring the occurrence of illusory control in more complex interactions, this article proposed a design of experience based on relevant theories and findings on the illusion of control, in combination with behaviour prediction theories. Participants are put in an interactive environment and are guided to interact with a robot. One’s actual control over the robot is manipulated in that the robot first behaves as responsive but later not. The robot has predefined movements and would perform these movements automatically. Participants are required to operate some objects with which they think they are able to control the robot, and finally try to “catch” the robot by leading it to a trap. Finally, whether the installation has successfully induced an illusory control and how it works for different individuals will be discussed through participants’ feedback on the experience.
Thesis supervisors: Bas Haring and Jochen Riester


11.30 – 12.05 Marcello Gómez Maureira
Title:The Impact of Co-Located Play on Social Presence and Game Experience in Virtual Reality Games
Abstract: As virtual reality (VR) in digital games is making a return, this explorative study looks at the scenario of VR gaming in a social setting. The question is raised whether physical proximity during gameplay - co-located play - has an impact on game experience and social presence when compared to playing from separated locations. To answer this question, we asked 17 pairs of participants with prior social connection to each other, to play a two-player VR game using head mounted displays (HMDs). Two conditions were tested and compared to each other: playing in the same room, and playing in separated rooms. During the game, players would interact with each other in a shared virtual environment, and by talking to each other either directly (same room) or via an intercom (different rooms). Our results indicate that there is no difference between testing conditions. We conclude that current VR technology can facilitate a multi-user game experience over large distances that is experienced the same way as if it were played co-located.
Thesis supervisors: Fons Verbeek and Robin de Lange


12.05 – 12.40 BREAK

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Posted: 26 August 2015 03:30 PM   [ # 4 ]
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room 2

12.40 – 13.15 Beryl Noë
Title:Pay what you want, pay more to be better than the others, or pay less because others do too
Abstract: Pay-what-you want (PWYW) is an attractive pricing mechanism that allows customers to pay the amount they are motivated to spend. The model has been successfully implemented in restaurants and stores, but online applications remain risky. Online customers are less driven by guilt and less influenced by what others might think of them when deciding on a price, as they are anonymous and do not meet the seller. In the present study, social comparison was considered as a variable that might influence a payment decision. A participatory experiment was designed in the form of a mock online PWYW store to investigate this. Preliminary results show that customers that have chosen an initial price below average were more likely to compare themselves to others who had paid higher prices and increase the amount of money they wanted to pay. Simultaneously, those who choose a higher initial price were less likely to perform any comparison at all, and if they did, they were more likely to compare downward and reduce their final price. Additionally, individualists were more likely to decrease their final price after comparison, while prosocials were more likely to change their price towards the average.
Thesis supervisors: Fons Verbeek, Roger Whitaker, Stuart Allen

 

13.25 – 14.00 Sabrina Verhage
Title: “Track&Trace;: improving the chance for serendipitous encounters in urban public space using a drawing bot”

Abstract: Our frequent use of mobile technologies is altering the way we use and experience urban public space, one of its consequences might be a lower quality of experience of urban public space because of a lower chance for serendipitous encounters. In order to improve the chance for serendipitous encounters in urban public space we have designed Track&Trace; a cyber physical urban intervention in the form of an interactive drawing bot. The intervention is measured through a video-based place centered behavioral mapping. Additionally Track&Trace; provides a tool to assist place centered behavioral mapping.
Early results suggest Track&Trace; as an urban intervention is successful as a way to change people’s focus of attention and people’s direction of movement, but also to lower people’s speed of motion and increase people’s duration of stay in urban public space. Perhaps this increases the chance for serendipitous encounters, we cannot conclude however it increases social interaction between strangers. 

Thesis supervisors: Peter van der Putten and Chris Kievid

 

14.10 – 14.45 Livia Teernstra
Title:Studying Moral Foundations using Supervised Machine Learning
Abstract: This study tests the possibility of teaching a computer program to detect elements of morality. It uses a novel application of supervised machine learning to identify the presence of underlying moral perspectives in the social media application “Twitter”. Moral Foundations Theory sets the framework for Multinomial Naive Bayes and Maximum Entropy models to classify “Tweets”. Overall, the Naive Bayes model achieved a similar level of classification accuracy as human coders, outperforming Maximum Entropy. The successful classifier was then applied to unlabelled Tweets regarding the Greek exit from the Eurozone. The results show that Tweets can be classified into moral foundations to examine changes in people’s moral perspectives over time. 

Thesis supervisors: Fons Verbeek, Peter van der Putten, Liesbeth Noordegraaf-Eelens 


14.45 - 14.55 BREAK

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Posted: 26 August 2015 03:39 PM   [ # 5 ]
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room 2

14.55 – 15.30 Jules Verdijk
Title:Evolving affective abstract art through measures learned from a corpus of human-made art
Abstract: In this study a new approach in evolutionary art is taken by evolving affective abstract art based on measures learned from a corpus of human-made art. Through a web survey 200 artworks were rated on the affect dimensions pleasure, arousal and dominance, and 69 image features were extracted from each artwork. Regression models were learned based on these features and the rated affect and tested on their accuracy in predicting affect, resulting in an affect measure for each dimension. Due to low consistency in the affect ratings and restrictions in the used image features, the measures had low accuracy in predicting arousal and dominance. Thus, the study focussed on using the measure for pleasure as the fitness function in a novel evolutionary system that generates art within a restricted style, including arousal and dominance as secondary measures. Sets of artworks were evolved for specific goals of affect, of which 90 were selected for a web survey to validate the affect of the images produced by the system. Results of this survey showed that the system is capable of generating art on a wide range of affect, but is only effective in generating art for affect goals on the extremities of the pleasure, arousal and dominance dimensions.
Thesis supervisors: Peter van der Putten and Eelco den Heijer

 

15.40 – 16.15 Bernd Dudzik
Title:Having a heart-to-heart: Exploring the capacity of heartbeat-feedback to mediate affective information in interpersonal communication
Abstract: In this study we explore whether having access to other person’s heartbeat-signals has the capacity to act as a nonverbal channel for the exchange of affective information. Within an experimental setting (N=33) we exposed sender-subjects with emotional stimuli that varied in the level of emotional intensity that they induced. Simultaneously, non-collocated receiver-subjects were provided with vibrotactile representations of senders’ heartbeat-signals, and tasked to judge whether the signal had been caused by exposure to either a stimulus of low or high emotional intensity. Cases of successful mediation of affective information were defined as the agreement between receivers’ choices with senders’ self-reported affective experiences. Results demonstrated that the average rate of successful mediation of affective information across sender-receiver couplings was significantly larger than what might have been expected based on random chance. This finding highlights the potential of heartbeat-signals as a nonverbal channel for the communication of affective information. Implications for applications and future areas of investigation are discussed.
Thesis supervisors: Peter van der Putten and Joost Broekens

 

16.25 - 17.00 Paul Kasteleyn
Title:Improving depth awareness for divers in free ascend
Abstract: One of the main hazards of diving is decompression sickness (DCS). The risk of DCS can be decreased by ascending slowly and taking stops at different depths. Maintaining a steady depth during these stops is difficult due to the unstable situation of a diver. Existing methods of determining depths are either not accurate enough, require environmental factors or constantly require a large amount of attention. In this study a device was developed that indicates a deviation of stop depths using LEDs with different colors. Test dives with and without the device were made with 6 divers. After each dive the dive profile was analyzed, a situational awareness rating scale (SART) was calculated and each diver filled in a questionnaire about the use of the device. No clear differences were found in dive profiles or situational awareness between the dives with and without device. However, most of the test divers seemed to be enthusiastic about the idea, scored the dive as less difficult and felt more secure while using the device.
Thesis supervisors: Peter van der Putten and Olivier van der Post

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